Category: Preparedness (Page 1 of 8)

Egyptian Spinach

I was watching Self Sufficient Me and halfway through the video he mentioned Egyptian Spinach. I thought this would make another great prepper plant to plant or store seeds from.

Common Names: Bush okra, Jew’s mallow, Jute, Jute mallow, Meloukia, Molokhia, Moroheia, Moroheiya, Mulukhiyah (and other spelling variations), Nalta jute, Tassa, Tasso, Wild okra, tororo no, koshta, saluyot, po krachao, rau day, West African sorrel, Malu Khia, Melokheya, Meloukia, Salad Mallow, Jew’s mallow, Moroheiya

This “food of kings” dates back to the time of the pharaohs, when an Egyptian king drank it in soup to recover from an illness. Modern Egyptians also use Molokhia to make a soup prepared since ancient times that is considered highly nutritious.

A very hardy, fast-growing annual. The young leaves used in salad, older leaves and the shoot tips are cooked like spinach and are high in protein. It self-sows readily. Sow spring and summer. Suitable for subtropical and tropical areas.

The seed is naturally green in colour and is NOT treated. Start seeds in flats or direct sow fairly heavily and thin. This is hot weather-loving green. Plant out after the danger of frost has passed and the soil is warm. It does best in good soil for rapid growth, so continue to provide compost or nutrients throughout the season. Likes full sun, warm to hot weather and steady moisture – mulch will help keep the soil moist. Cut tender top leaves continuously or harvest whole plant and succession-sow.

https://growerjim.blogspot.com/2014/12/molokhia-egyptian-spinach.html

Exped Dura 8R

I updated my sleeping pad to the Exped brand.

I was watching a vid on you-tube and they mentioned the 7R and I hadn’t known that the sleeping mats went any higher than 4.5R. Ive had enough of freezing my buttocks off on overnight camps.

I originally looked at the 7, however didnt find many places with that model in stock in a reg length 7 wide. After measuring my bivi I actually required the Long Wide and the 8 kept coming up in stock.

A little heavier than I would have liked for hiking however I have to drag my gear in on a trolley, so it didn’t really matter. If this one works out I may grab a 6 for one of my other packs where weight is more of an issue.

Ill be trying to test out over the next few months.

Guerrilla Gardening

“Guerrilla gardening is the act of gardening – raising food, plants, or flowers – on land that the gardeners do not have the legal rights to cultivate, such as abandoned sites, areas that are not being cared for, or private property. It encompasses a diverse range of people and motivations, ranging from gardeners who spill over their legal boundaries to gardeners with a political purpose, who seek to provoke change by using guerrilla gardening as a form of protest or direct action. “

I was watching Survival Lilly dis-morning.Link below that was shedding light on what was occurring in Europe. Such as Britain making backyard gardeners register chickens, organic farms having accidents and being shut down etc. She suggested starting Guerilla Gardens to combat backyards being forced to shut down. With news headlines quoting that backyard gardeners create more carbon that big businesses.

I had tried this many years ago with varying degrees of success. I was in a mobility scooter on oxygen scooting around seed bombing different areas to see if it would work. The places that weren’t spayed by the local councils did in fact thrive.

“Who controls the food controls the people” Henry Kissenger 1974

https://www.thethinkingconservative.com/who-controls-by-henry-kissinger

Maybe its about time we all looked at Guerilla Gardening as a way of food security for the future.

http://www.guerrillagardening.org/

https://todayshomeowner.com/lawn-garden/guides/ultimate-guide-to-guerilla-gardening

https://www.abc.net.au/gardening/how-to/guerilla-gardens/13924202

Sustainment Bags

I don’t like the term BUG OUT BAG! It gives the impression that you can head off into the woods and survive with very little else. Three Days being the standard time frame, hence the 72 hour bag. In my opinion if you rely on a bug out bag you will eventually become a refugee.

If one of many scenarios happens, the so called bug out bag should be part of your PACE, (Primary, Alternate, Contingency and Emergency), plan. Not the whole plan.

I prefer the term sustainment bag, either a 3 day or a 10 day, for example. Even though the same equipment is in both bags ; medical, shelter, cutting tools, food, hydration, lighting, combustion, navigation, self defense, cooking etc. The term sustainment has a more realistic overview of its capabilities, just with a different methodology behind it.

A get home bag for in a vehicle I can understand, an emergency bag I can understand. However bugging out requires some where to go to. Most people don’t have that option. INCH bags, there’s no way to live out of it for extended periods. I mean atleast three months unless your in the perfect area for game and edible native foods and the ability to hunt and identify plants.

In reality it takes months to start a garden and requiring food to keep you fueled while building a shelter.

Having a small pack with three days of food and tools to support yourself and to throw into your vehicle when traveling off the beaten track will sustain you until the food and water runs out. The same with a larger backpack with ten days of food. Both of which I keep working on building with constant updates to equipment. However they are the E in my PACE plan not the primary action to rely upon..

Abika or Queensland Greens (Edible Hibiscus)

Abelmoschus manihot, commonly known as aibika, is a flowering plant in the family Malvaceae. It is a subshrub or shrub native to the Indian subcontinent, Indochina, central and southern China, Malesia, New Guinea, and Queensland. It was previously classified as a species of Hibiscus but is now categorized under the genus Abelmoschus.

Family: Malvaceae

Genus: Abelmoschus

Kingdom: Plantae

Species: A. manihot

Other common names; Aibika (PNG), Sunset Muskmallow, Sunset Hibiscus, Pele (Polynesia), Ailan Kapis (Vanuata), Lettuce Tree, Bele (Fiji), Beli (Tonga), and Slippery Cabbage (Solomon Islands).

Aibika has a potential yield of 65 tonnes per year, which makes it one of the highest yielding leafy vegetable. This, combined with its high nutrition profile and ease of growth, makes it one of the most important, most understated food plants.

Another good survival crop to keep an eye out for.

Jetboil Half Gen

I recently purchased a new cooker for use in the van. A Jetboil half Gen that works off small LPG canisters but can also have an adapter hose attached to use larger 4.5 to 9 kilo bottles.

nice size for van life
adapter hose for larger bottles
connector
comes with a frying pan
the sized bottles to use on a bench top

A lot easier to use to carry in and out of the van to cook on park benchtops. Review to follow.

https://www.snowys.com.au/halfgen-basecamp-system

Sere Paracord Bracelet Project

I came across this project from Mitch at Agonic through the Baer Solutions Channel. Apart from looking like an every day bracelet it can also be used as an improvised cable tie for handcuffs or for locking a hotel door for added security. A great addition to an EDC. Check out Mitch’s other contributions at Grand Thumb and Dirty Civilian.

26:00 to 28:30

https://www.survivalsuppliesaustralia.com.au/GTFO-Escape-Bracelet

with GTFO bracelet

Food Forest Garden Design (Australian Temperate Zone)

A continuance from Gardening with machetes, I wanted to make a list of plants to start my Food Forest Design based around creating small islands beginning with a central tree surrounded by a nitrogen fixer, a perennial, herbs, flowers, berry’s, pest management , medicinal and vegetables to have all year round fruit and vegetables , with low maintenance features. This is an almost complete list that would still have to be shaved down to suit individual tastes , soil types and climates. I’m hoping to find someone that wants to rent out a piece of their property for me to build this to live on, preferably in a tipi.

Nitrogen Fixers including Australian Natives

The most common nitrogen fixing plants are the plants and trees from the family Fabaceae (bean and pea), which includes legumes such as alfalfa, beans, clovers, lupines, peanuts, peas, and leguminous trees, such as tagasaste (tree lucerne) and acacias.

Plants from the Fabaceae (legume, bean & pea) family host symbiotic nitrogen fixing Rhizobium bacteria in their root nodules. There are some members of the Fabaceae family which do no fix nitrogen, such as carob and honey locust trees.

Conversely, some non-leguminous species have the ability to fix nitrogen, such as alder, bayberry, casuarina, elaeagnus as well as the tiny floating aquatic fern azolla (fairy moss).

Edibles legume crops such as peas (garden, snow and sugarsnap), alfalfa (lucerne), broad beans (fava beans), common beans (bush beans, climbing beans), mung beans, soybeans, perennial beans (7-year beans, scarlet runners, climbing lima beans), peanuts, chickpeas, lentils.

Nitrogen fixing legume crops such as alfalfa/lucerne (Medicago sativa), birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus), clover (Trifolium species, such as crimson, red, white, rose, subterranean), cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum), gorse (Ulex europaeus), hairy vetch (aka woolly pod vetch, Vicia villosa), lablab (Lablab purpureus), lespedezas (aka Japanese clovers), liquorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra), lupin (Lupinus species), medics, perennial peanut (Arachis glabrata), pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan), pinto peanut (Arachis pintoi), scotch broom (Cytisus scoparius), wynn’s cassia (Cassia rotundifolia).

Summer Legumes: cowpea, lablab, mung bean, soybean, lucerne

Summer Grasses: buckwheat, French white millet, Japanese millet

Winter Legumes: fava bean (broad bean), fenugreek, lupins, sub clover, red clover, white clover, woolly pod vetch, chick pea

Winter Grasses: barley, oats, rye, wheat, buckwheat

Winter/Summer other: Biofume mustards, beets, corn salad, endive, kale, mustard, purslane, rocket, radish, spinach, turnip

Australian Native Nitrogen Fixing Legumes

The Fabaceae (legume) family can be divided into three subfamilies:

Sub-family Faboideae – typical pea-flowered plants

Sub-family Mimosoideae – Acacias & related plants

Sub-family Caesalpinioideae – Senna, Cassia & related plants

Sub-family Faboideae – pea-flowered plants, which includes Aotus, Bossiaea, Castanospermum, Chorizema, Crotalaria, Daviesia, Dillwynia, Gastrolobium, Glycine, Gompholobium, Goodia, Hardenbergia, Hovea, Indigofera, Jacksonia, Kennedia, Oxylobium, Phyllota, Platylobium, Podolobium, Pultenaea, Swainsona, Templetonia

Sub-family Mimosoideae – Acacias & related plants, which includes the Wattle species, ranging in size from small shrubs to large trees

Sub-family Caesalpinioideae – Senna, Cassia & related plants, ranging in size from small shrubs to large trees

Non-Leguminous Nitrogen Fixing Plants

Some nitrogen fixing plants are not from the Fabaceae (legume) family.

Lacy phacelia (Phacelia tanacetifolia) from the Boraginaceae (borage and forget-me-not family), is an excellent bee-forage.

Elaeagnus (silverberries), Hippophae (sea-buckthorns) and Shepherdia (buffaloberries) from the Elaeagnaceae (oleaster) family. The ebbing’s silverberry (Elaeagnus x ebbingei) is a popular fruiting permaculture hedging plant that can grow anywhere, sun or shade.

Ceanothus, Colletia, Discaria, Kentrothamnus, Retanilla, Talguenea, Trevoa from the Rhamnaceae (buckthorn) family.

Cercocarpus (mountain mahoganies), Chamaebatia (mountain miseries), Dryas, Purshia/Cowania (bitterbrushes/cliffroses) from the Rosaceae (rose) family.

Myrica (babyberries) from the Myricaceae family, includes edible Chinese bayberry (Myrica rubra).

Allocasuarina and Casuarina (she-oaks), Australian trees from the Casuarinaceae family.

Azolla (fairy moss) a genus of seven species of tiny floating aquatic ferns from the Salviniaceae family.

Alder trees from the genus Alnus in the Betulaceae (birch) family have a symbiotic relationship with the actinomycete Frankia alni, a filamentous, nitrogen-fixing microorganism, which resides in root nodules of the tree.

Weeds

Three Major groups of weeds. The first comprises of those that live in acid soil and therefore indicating increased acidity. To this group belong the Sorrels, Docks, Finger-leaf weeds, Lady’s Thumb, and Horsetail.

The second major group indicates crust formation or hard pan in th soil. Belonging here are the Field Mustard, The horse Nettle, Penny Cress. Morning Glory, Quack Grass, The Camomiles and the Pine Apple Weed.

The third major group consists of those weeds which follow human cultivation, spreading out with compost and manure, wherever man walks. Here belong the Lambs Quarters, Plaintain, Chickweed, Buttercup, Dandelion, Nettle, Prostate knot Weed, Prickly Lettuce, Field Speedwell, Rough Pigweed, Common Horehound, Celandine, Mallows, Carpetweed.

The acid soil groups tell us the best which changes are occurring in the soils. acidity in the soil increases with lack of air, standing water in surface layer, cultivating in too wet a soil, insufficient cultivation, insufficient drainage, one-sided cultivation, wrong kind of fertilizers used, excess adic fertilizers, increasing sheet erosion and loss of humus.

Indicates –

Slightly acid soil due to insufficient cultivation ; Daisies, Horsetail, Field Sorrel, Prostate Knotweed.

Very acid Soil due to Wrong cultivation or insufficient drainage ; Cinquefoil, Swampy Horsetail, Hawkweed and knapweed.

Salty soils ; Shepards Purse, Russian Thistle, Sea Plantain, Sea Aster, Artemisia Maritima.

Hard Pan soils ; Wild Mustard and Horse Nettle.

Dry soils ; Mustard, Silvery Cinquefoil, Russian Thistle, Agrimony, catchfly, Broom Bush, Crotalaria, Dyers Greenweed, Rabbits Foot clover, Sweet clover, ST barnabys, Malthease Thistle, Common speedwel, Prostate Pigweed, Spurge, Shrubby ST Johnswort.

Sandy Soils : Most Golden rods, flowered Aster, Arrow Leaved wild lettuse, Yellow toad flax, Ononis, Partrdige Pea, Broom Bush.

Steepe Formation ; Russian Thisstle, Sage, Loco Weed.

Alcaline soils ; Sage brush, Woody Aster.

Lime Stone Soils ; Penny Cress, Field Peppergrass, Hares Ear mustard, Wormseed, Canada Blue Grass, Cornelian cherry, Barnabys Thisstle, Field madder, Mountain bluet, yellow Camomile.

High potasium in Soil ; Marsh mallow, wormwood, knapweed, Fumatory, Opium poppy. (Red clover disappears with lack of potasium)

Absence of lime ; Yellow Clover, Rabbits foot clover, fox glove, wild pansy, garden sorrel, sundews, white mullen, scotch broom, black vetchling.

Gypsum ; Common burdock

Moist badly Drained soils ; Smartweed, Mild water pepper, hedge bindweed, silverweed, white avens, swampy horsetail, meadow pink, hedge nettle, stinking willie, canada and narrow leaf goldenrod, tradescant, purple stem aster, joe pye weed, march foxtail, rice cut grass.

On Pastures ; Buttercups, Dock, knotweed, fingerweeds, white avens, grass leaved stickwort, ST Johnswort, pokeweed, Milkweed, Wild garlic, Briar, Thistles.

Sources of Minerals and Trace Elements –

bulbous Buttercup ; cobalt, copper, iron, manganese, phosphorus, potasium

broad leaved dock ; phosphorus, potasium

chamomile ; calcium, potasium,

coltsfoor ; calcium, copper, iron, magnesium, potasium, sulphur.

Sheperds purse ; calcium.

chickweed ; manganese, potasium

comfrey ; calcium, nitrogen potasium

creeping thistle ; calcium, copper, iron, potasium

daisy ; calcium, magnesium

dandelion ; calcium, copper, iron

fat hen ; calcium, iron

groundsel ; iron

pimpernel ; calcium

cleavers ; calcium

great pantain ; calcium, copper, iron, potasium, silica

horsetail ; calcium, cobalt, iron, magnesium, silica

silverweed ; iron, calcium, magnesium

sow thistle ; copper, potasium

stinging nettle ; calcium, copper, iron, nitrogen, potasium

sun spurge ; boron

valerian ; silica

yarrow ; copper, nitrogen, phosphorus, potasium,

tufted vetch ; cobalt, copper, phosphorus, potasium.

Vegetables

January

Amaranth, Asparagus Pea, Beans / Climbing & Bush, Beetroot, Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Burdock, Carrots, Chives, Coriander, Cucumber, Huauzontle, Kohlrabi, Leeks, Lettuce, Malabar Greens, Mustard Greens, Okra, Oregano, Parsley, Parsnip, Pumpkin, Radish, Rocket, Rosella, Silverbeet, Squash, Sunflower, Sweet Corn, Turnips / Swedes, Warrigal Greens, NZ Spinach

Febuary

Amaranth, Asparagus Pea, Beetroot, Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Burdock, Cabbage (tight-headed), Carrots, Chives, Coriander, Cucumber, Endive, Florence Fennel, Huauzontle, Jerusalem Artichoke, Kale, Collards, Kohlrabi, Lettuce, Long Yam, Luffa, Malabar Greens, Mangle-wurzel, Mizuna, Mustard Greens, Okra, Onion, Oregano, Pak Choy, Bok Choy etc, Parsley, Parsnip, Peas/Snow Peas, Potatoes, Pumpkin, Quinoa, Radish, Rocket, Rockmelon, Rosella, Salsify, Shallots, Silverbeet, Spring Onions, Spinach, Squash, Sunflower, Sweet Corn, Sweet Potato, Tomatoes, Turnips / Swedes, Warrigal Greens, NZ Spinach, Watermelon, Water Chestnut, Zucchini

March

Amaranth, Beetroot, Broad Beans, Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Burdock, Cabbage (loose-headed), Cabbage (tight-headed), Carrots, Cauliflower, Chives, Coriander, Endive, Florence Fennel, Kale, Collards, Kohlrabi, Leeks, Lettuce, Malabar Greens, Mizuna, Mustard Greens, Onion, Oregano, Pak Choy, Bok Choy etc, Parsley, Parsnip, Radish, Rocket, Rockmelon, Rosella, Salsify, Shallots, Silverbeet, Spinach, Turnips / Swedes

April

Beetroot, Broad Beans, Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Burdock, Cabbage (loose-headed), Cabbage (tight-headed), Carrots, Cauliflower, Chives, Endive, Garlic, Huauzontle, Jerusalem Artichoke, Kale, Collards, Kohlrabi, Leeks, Lettuce, Mangle-wurzel, Mizuna, Mustard Greens, Onion, Oregano, Pak Choy, Bok Choy etc, Parsley, Peas/Snow Peas, Radish, Rocket, Salsify, Shallots, Silverbeet, Spinach, Turnips / Swedes

May

Broad Beans, Burdock, Cabbage (loose-headed), Cabbage (tight-headed), Carrots, Chicory, Chives, Endive, Garlic, Huauzontle, Jerusalem Artichoke, Kohlrabi, Lettuce, Mangle-wurzel, Mizuna, Mustard Greens, Oregano, Pak Choy, Bok Choy etc, Parsley, Peas/Snow Peas, Radish, Rocket, Salsify, Shallots, Silverbeet, Spinach, Turnips / Swedes

June

Broad Beans, Cabbage (loose-headed), Cabbage (tight-headed), Chicory, Endive, Garlic, Jerusalem Artichoke, Lettuce, Onion, Peas/Snow Peas, Radish, Shallots

July

Broad Beans, Cabbage (loose-headed), Cabbage (tight-headed), Chicory, Endive, Garlic, Jerusalem Artichoke, Kohlrabi, Lettuce, Mustard Greens, Onion, Parsnip, Peas/Snow Peas, Radish, Shallots

August

Artichoke (Globe), Asparagus, Beetroot, Cabbage (loose-headed), Cabbage (tight-headed), Chicory, Endive, Garlic, Jerusalem Artichoke, Kohlrabi, Leeks, Lettuce, Mustard Greens, Onion, Parsnip, Peas/Snow Peas, Potatoes, Radish, Shallots, Spinach, Spring Onions, Tomatoes, Watermelon

September

Amaranth, Artichoke (Globe), Asparagus, Asparagus Pea, Basil, Beans / Climbing & Bush, Beetroot, Broccoli, Burdock, Cabbage (loose-headed), Cabbage (tight-headed), Capsicum, Carrots, Celeriac, Celery, Chicory, Chilli, Chives, Coriander, Cucumber, Eggplant, Endive, Florence Fennel, Garlic, Jerusalem Artichoke, Kale, Collards, Kohlrabi, Leeks, Lettuce, Malabar Greens, Mangle-wurzel, Mizuna, Mustard Greens, Oregano, Pak Choy, Bok Choy etc, Parsley, Parsnip, Peas/Snow Peas, Potatoes, Pumpkin, Radish, Rocket, Rockmelon, Salsify, Shallots, Silverbeet, Spinach, Tomatoes, Turnips / Swedes, Watermelon, Zucchini

October

Amaranth, Artichoke (Globe), Asparagus, Asparagus Pea, Basil, Beans / Climbing & Bush, Beetroot, Broccoli, Burdock, Cabbage (loose-headed), Cabbage (tight-headed),, Capsicum, Carrots, Chicory, Chilli, Chives, Coriander, Cucumber, Eggplant, Florence Fennel, Garlic, Kale, Collards, Kohlrabi, Leeks, Lettuce, Luffa, Malabar Greens, Mangle-wurzel, Mizuna, Mustard Greens, Okra, Oregano, Pak Choy, Bok Choy etc, Parsley, Parsnip, Potatoes, Pumpkin, Quinoa, Radish, Rocket, Rockmelon, Rosella, Salsify, Silverbeet, Spring Onions, Squash, Sunflower, Sweet Corn, Tomatoes, Turnips / Swedes, Warrigal Greens, NZ Spinach, Watermelon, Water Chestnut, Zucchini

November

Amaranth, Artichoke (Globe), Asparagus, Asparagus Pea, Basil, Beans / Climbing & Bush, Beetroot, Broccoli, Burdock, Cabbage (loose-headed), Capsicum, Carrots, Celeriac, Celery, Chicory, Chilli, Chives, Coriander, Cucumber, Eggplant, Kale, Collards, Kohlrabi, Leeks, Lettuce, Long Yam, Luffa, Malabar Greens, Mangle-wurzel, Mizuna, MustardGreens, Okra, Oregano, Parsley, Parsnip, Potatoes, Pumpkin, Quinoa, Radish, Rocket, Rockmelon, Rosella, Salsify, Silverbeet, Squash, Sunflower, Sweet Corn, Tomatoes, Turnips / Swedes, Warrigal Greens, NZ Spinach, Watermelon, Zucchini

December

Amaranth, Asparagus Pea, Basil, Beans / Climbing & Bush, Beetroot, Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Burdock, Cabbage (tight-headed), Capsicum, Carrots, Chicory, Chilli, Chives, Coriander, Cucumber, Eggplant, Kohlrabi, Leeks, Lettuce, Luffa, Malabar Greens, Mizuna, Mustard Greens, Okra, Oregano, Parsley, Parsnip, Peas/Snow Peas, Potatoes, Pumpkin, Quinoa, Radish, Rocket, Rockmelon, Rosella, Salsify, Silverbeet, Squash, Sunflower, Sweet Corn, Tomatoes, Turnips / Swedes, Warrigal Greens, NZ Spinach, Watermelon, Zucchini

Perenial Crops

Rhubarb – Rheum rhabarbarum

Sorrel – Rumex acetosa

Chives – Allium schoenoprasum

Asparagus – Asparagus officinalis

Jerusalem artichoke – Helianthus tuberosus

Globe artichoke – Cynara scolymus

Horseradish – Armoracia rusticana

Watercress – Nasturtium officinale

Garlic (typically grown as an annual) – Allium sativum

Kale (typically grown as an annual) – Brassica oleracea var. sabellica

Bunching onions – Egyptian onions – Allium proliferum

Good King Henry – Chenopodium bonus-henricus

Lovage – Levisticum officinale

Rampsons – Allium ursinum

Ostrich fern – Matteuccia struthiopteris

Radicchio (typically grown as an annual) – Cichorium intybus

Three cornered leek – Allium triquetrum

Nasturtium -Nasturtium officinale

Groundnut Apios Americana

Scarlet Runner Beans -Phaseolus coccineus

Sea Kale – Crambe maritime

Fastest Growing

Apple , Avocado , Moringa, Guava, Plum , Lemon, Passion fruit , Raspberrys , Blue berry, Mulberry trees, Peach , Strawberrys, Cherrys , Mandarin , Papyaya , Fig , Custard Apple , Jujube, Banana / Plaintain, Lime, Elderberry, Chestnuts, Goose berry , Coji berry, Black Currant, Loquat, Olive, Bilberrys, Sweet Carob, Apricot, Nectrine, Paw Paw, Pear, Persimmon, Pomegranate, Hazel nuts.

What fruits can you grow in your climate?

Cool (choose low or high chill varieties): Apple, pear, peach, nectarine, plum, apricot, fig, mulberry, raspberry, blackberry, grape, olive and citrus.

Temperate (choose low-chill varieties): Apple, peach, nectarine, pear, plum, blueberry, kiwi fruit, medlar, date, nashi, apricot, olive and citrus

Sub-Tropical (usually grow well in coastal ;conditions from Mackay to Sydney): Avocado, passionfruit, guava, tamarillo, loquat, jaboticaba, walnut, babaco, black sapote and custard apple.

Tropical (protected from cold winds with warm, humid conditions): Papaya, pawpaw, rambutan, mango, pineapple, gooseberry, jackfruit, carambola and longan

Arid (dry in summer): Carob, feijoa, jujube, olive, pomegranate, fig, pistachio, almond, grape, quince and citrus.

Pest Managment species

· Alyssum, Carpet of Snow – attracts beneficial insects

· Basil, Cinnamon – repels mosquitoes and deters potato beetles

· Basil, Genovese – all around my favorite to repel almost everything

· Borage- repels tomato hornworms and deters squash bugs

· Calendula- to deter cabbage moths and aphids

· Chamomile, German

· Chives- to deter aphids and Japanese beetles

· Cilantro – to attract hoverflies

· Dill- helps cabbage family and attracts beneficial insects

· Marigold- to repel cabbage moths, potato beetles and squash bugs

· Nasturium- to repel aphids, potato bugs and squash bugs, but also to attract a lot of bugs away from your other vegetables

· Oregano- to deter a wide variety of insects

· Painted Daisy

· Parsley- to attract hoverflies

· Petunia, Dwarf Mix – repels aphids

· Sage- to deter cabbage moths and carrot flies

· Sunflower- to attract bug eating birds

· Thyme- to deter cabbage moths

· zinnia- to attract Japanese beetles away from your beans

Medicinal Herb Garden

· Anise Hyssop

· Basil, Genovese

· Basil, Holy

· Bee Balm

· Chamomile, German

· Catnip

· Calendula, Pacific Beauty

· Cilantro

· Dill, Bouquet

· Korean Licorice Mint

· Lavender, Vera

· Lemon Balm

· Lemon Mint

· Spearmint

· Echinacea

· Parsley, Flat leaf

· Plantain

· Yarrow

Fruit all Year round

January: Capulin cherries, blueberries, plums, plumcotts, late apricots, pawpaws, lemons, lychees, strawberries and all the brambleberries, peaches, nectarines, plums.

February: Apples, figs, blueberries, jackfruit, jaboticoba, guava, pepinos, lychees, nashi, pears, rockmelons and watermelons, more berries.

March: Apples, olives, avocadoes, custard apples, lychees, brambleberries, early quinces, early persimmons, pears, melons, grapes, strawberries and brambleberries.

April: Pomegranates, medlars, pears, Valencia oranges, lemons, early limes, olives, late figs, quinces, Granny Smith and other medium late apples, passionfruit, tamarillos, late grapes, chestnuts, walnuts, persimmons, grapefruit, guavas, feijoas, strawberry guavas, carob, chestnuts, Brazilian cherries, pomegranates, guavas, jackfruit, early calamondins, lillypillies, kerriberries, late strawberries, raspberries, bananas, avocadoes, Irish strawberry-tree fruit, melons, pistachios and pecans.

May: Figs, early mandarins, limes, pomegranates, late apples, late Valencia or early Navel oranges, tangelos, citrons, kumquats, tamarillos, early kiwifruit, late passionfruit high up on the vine, late raspberries, late strawberries if grown on a high garden away from early frost, olives, persimmons if the birds havent finished them, feijoa, bananas, medlars.

June: Apples (Lady Williams, Sturmer Pippin, French Crab), feijoa, Navel oranges, kiwifruit, limes, mandarins, citrons, grapefruit, bananas, avocadoes, late passionfruit high on the vine, banana passionfruit, guava, strawberry guava, pomegranates if the birds havent eaten them, lillypillies in warm areas, citrons, medlars, olives, late tamarillos above the frost, winter rhubarb.

July: Apples (Lady Williams, Sturmer Pippin, French Crab), feijoa, Navel oranges, kiwifruit, limes, mandarins, citrons, grapefruit, bananas, avocadoes, late passionfruit high on the vine, banana passionfruit, guava, strawberry guava, pomegranates if the birds havent eaten them, lillypillies in warm areas, citrons, medlars, olives, late tamarillos above the frost, winter rhubarb.

August: Sturmer Pippin or Lady Williams apples that improve when stored and wrinkled, unlike most other fruit, stored quinces, Navel oranges, lemons, lemonade fruit, custard apples in warm areas, tangelos, mandarins, cumquats, calamondins, pomelos, shaddock, satsuma, lillypillies in warm areas, Atherton raspberries in warmer areas, Japanese raisin fruit (swollen stems), kiwifruit, grapefruit, avocadoes, a few macadamia nuts, rhubarb and Tahitian and kaffir limes.

September: Navel oranges, lemons, grapefruit, cumquats, calamondins, limes, tangelos, tangor, mandarins, avocadoes, small alpine strawberries (not the large, new varieties that fruit later), Japanese raisin fruit, lillypillies, pawpaw in warmer areas, Cape gooseberries if they havent been frosted off (autumn will mature now), ditto tamarillos, early loquats and rhubarb.

October: Loquats, Navel oranges, lemons, limes, tangelos, tangor, mandarins, grapefruit, cumquats, calamondins, pomelos, citrons, Tahitian limes, kaffir limes, citrons, early blueberries, lillypillies, Japanese raisin fruit, avocadoes, early strawberries, early raspberries in warm spots, rhubarb, banana passionfruit and tamarillos ripening from last season. Keep eating stored Lady Williams apples and nuts.

November: Cherries, early peaches, early nectarines, early apricots, small early plums, loquats, oranges, mandarins, citrons, bush lemons, early Capulin cherries, lemons, limes, grapefruit, tangelos, avocadoes, strawberries, blueberries, early loganberries, Japanese raisin fruit, lillypillies and early raspberries.

December: Cherries, nectarines, peaches, plums, apricots, passionfruit, banana passionfruit, gooseberries, Cape gooseberries, Valencia oranges left on the tree, lemons, strawberries, raspberries, blueberries, boysenberries and other brambleberries such as loganberries, Capulin cherries, lillypillies and sometimes early figs.

Edible Flowers

Nasturtium – Whirlybird

Cornflower – Mixed

Pansy – Swiss Giant

Borage – Blue

Forget-Me-Not – Mixed

Viola – Johnny Jump Up

Sun Flower

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